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  • 08 Aug 2018 12:35 PM | Anonymous

    Delays in tabulating the votes in Johnson County forced election watchers to wait until 8 a.m. today to get the unofficial results of the Republican primary race for Governor.  Results are still unofficial, with recent mail-in ballots, provisional ballots, and some hand counted ballots not yet included.

    Does your vote count?  Take note of incumbent State Representative Steve Becker of Buhler who appears to have lost his seat by one vote.  

    The posted results show Secretary of State Kris Kobach winning the primary by a very narrow margin of 191 votes out of 311,009 recorded votes.  Although the election has been called, Governor Colyer is not yet conceding the race, releasing a statement this morning saying that with, "the presence of thousands of as yet uncounted provisional ballots and the extraordinary problems with the count, particularly in Johnson County, this election remains too close to call."

    Senator Laura Kelly won the Democrat primary with more than twice the votes of the closest challenger.

    Republican Primary - Governor

    R-Jim Barnett

    27,449

    9%

    R-Jeff Colyer

    126,066

    41%

    R-Kris Kobach

    126,257

    41%

    R-Patrick "PK" Kucera

    3,123

    1%

    R-Tyler Ruzich

    2,217

    1%

    R-Ken Selzer

    24,356

    8%

    R-Joseph Tutera Jr.

    1,541

    1%

    Democrat Primary - Governor

    D-Arden Andersen

    12,845

    8%

    D-Jack Bergeson

    3,850

    3%

    D-Carl Brewer

    30,693

    20%

    D-Laura Kelly

    78,746

    52%

    D-Joshua Svaty

    26,722

    18%

    Watkins wins Republican Primary for 2nd District US House of Representatives.  Steve Watkins, a former Army Ranger and a newcomer to Kansas politics, has defeated three state senators, a state representative, and a former Speaker of the House to be the Republican candidate for the 2nd District Congressional seat retired by Rep. Lynn Jenkins.  Watkins beat Senator Caryn Tyson with a hefty campaign account primarily funded by his father.  Read the KC Star article here.  Watkins will now face former Rep. Paul Davis (D-Lawrence) who ran for Governor in 2014.

    R-Vernon J. Fields

    1,950

    3%

    R-Steve Fitzgerald

    9,098

    12%

    R-Kevin Jones

    12,033

    16%

    R-Doug Mays

    6,135

    8%

    R-Dennis Pyle

    8,997

    12%

    R-Caryn Tyson

    17,499

    23%

    R-Steve Watkins

    19,753

    26%

    The incumbents won the other congressional primary races (Marshall, Yoder, Estes).  There was a close Democrat primary to select the candidate to challenge Kevin Yoder in the general election, with Sharice Davids emerging as the winner.  Davids is Native American, a mixed martial arts fighter and openly LGBT.  Read article here.  Democrats believe Yoder's seat could be vulnerable in the November election.

    Democrat Primary for 2nd District Congress

    D-Sharice Davids

    22,891

    37%

    D-Mike McCamon

    4,243

    7%

    D-Tom Niermann

    8,740

    14%

    D-Jay Sidie

    1,748

    3%

    D-Brent Welder

    20,803

    34%

    D-Sylvia D. Williams

    2,896

    5%

    Insurance Commissioner:

    R-Vicki Schmidt

    148,936

    52%

    R-Clark Shultz

    137,636

    48%

    Schmidt will run against Nathaniel MacLaughlin (D-Kansas City) in the general election.

    Secretary of State:

    R-Randy Duncan

    56,214

    20%

    R-Keith Esau

    27,810

    10%

    R-Craig McCullah

    31,854

    12%

    R-Scott Schwab

    106,569

    38%

    R-Dennis Taylor

    55,672

    20%

    Schwab will face Brian "BAM" McClendon, a software designer, developer and engineer with connections to Google Earth and Uber, for the general election in November.

    No More Campaigning:  There are 16 statehouse races that had only a primary race – in other words, the winning candidate has no general election opposition filed for the seat.  12 of these are Republican races and 4 are Democrat.

    District 6 – Incumbent Rep. Jene Vickrey (R-Louisburg) defeated challenger Clifford Blackmore (R-Paola).  He won the vote 62% to 38%.  

    District 11 – Incumbent Rep. Jim Kelly (R-Independence) defeated challenger John Lowrance (R-Independence).  He won the vote 76%-24%.

    District 12 – Incumbent Rep. Doug Blex (R-Independence) defeated challenger Brad Hall (R-Independence).  He won the vote 69%-31%.

    District 13 – Incumbent Rep. Larry Hibbard (R-Toronto) defeated challenger Londa Tindle (R-Fredonia).  He won the vote 55%-45%.

    District 22 – Incumbent Rep. Nancy Lusk (D-Overland Park) defeated challenger Michael L. Coleman III (D-Overland Park) with 89% of the vote.

    District 46 – Incumbent Rep. Boog Highberger (D-Lawrence) defeated challenger Benjamin Ferlo (D-Lawrence).  He won the vote 88%-12%.  

    District 55 – Incumbent Rep. Annie Kuether (D-Topeka) defeated challenger Joseph Stringer (D-Topeka) 88%-12%..  

    District 64 – Rep. Susan “Suzi” Carlson (R-Clay Center) beat Kathy Martin (R-Clay Center) 53%-47% to win the seat retired by Rep. Susie Swanson.

    District 74 – Stephen Owens (R-Hesston) defeated six term incumbent Rep. Don Schroeder (R-Hesston) 55%-45%.  Owens is considered more conservative with endorsements from the NRA and Kansas Chamber.

    District 75 – Former Rep. Will Carpenter (R-El Dorado) will return to Topeka after winning the primary 60%-40% against one term incumbent Rep. Mary Martha Good.  This was a rematch - Good beat Carpenter in the 2016 election by only 40 votes as a more moderate leaning candidate.

    District 80 – Wellington businessman Bill Rhiley beat one term incumbent Rep. Anita Judd-Jenkins (R-Arkansas City) 58% to 42%.  Rhiley had conservative endorsements.

    District 87 – This seat is retired by Roger Elliot.  Renee Erickson (R-Wichita) beat Jeff Kennedy (R-Wichita) 56%-44%.

    District 89 – Rep. KC Ohaebosim (D-Wichita) held onto his seat against two Democrat challengers from Wichita – LeSean Tarkington and Marty Keenan.  

    District 104 – Rep. Steven Becker (R-Buhler) appears to have lost his seat by one vote to challenger Paul Waggoner (R-Hutchinson) 2,014-2,013.  There will be a recount.

    District 107 – Incumbent Rep. Susan Concannon (R-Beloit) beat challenger Sam Sacco (R-Concordia) 56%-44%.

    District 124 –  Martin “Marty” Long (R-Ulysses) won 64% of the vote over Jeffrey G. Locke (R-Sublette) to fill the seat retired by Rep. Steve Alford.

    The Kansas House of Representatives may see a slight shift to the right.  There are several House races where conservative Republican candidates unseated more moderate Republicans that won in 2016.  In addition to the losses of Reps Schroeder, Good, Judd-Jenkins, and Becker - 

    District 8 – Rep. Patty Markley (R-Overland Park) lost to Chris Croft (R-Overland Park) 58%-42%.  Croft will face Michele Lobitz (D-Olathe) in November.

    District 28 – Rep. Joy Koesten (R-Leawood) lost to Kellie Warren (R-Leawood) 42%-58%, who received conservative endorsements.  Warren will take on Brian Clausen (D-Leawood) in the general election.

    On the other hand - conservative Republican John Whitmer was also unseated:

    District 93 - Republican incumbent John Whitmer (R-Wichita) lost to challenger J.C. Moore (R-Clearwater) by 52 votes (1136-1084).  Moore will run against Clifton Beck (D-Clearwater) in the general election.  Moore is a retired educator with a doctorate in chemistry - he cites four priorities: fiscal responsibility, excellent schools, great roads and expansion of KanCare.

    Other House Primary Results:

    District 5 - Mark Samsel (R-Wellsville) beat Renee Slinkard (R-Parker)  and will run against Lassey Murphy (D-Lane) in November to fill the House seat left behind by Kevin Jones, who ran for 2nd District Congress.

    District 14 – Charlotte Esau (R-Olathe) won the House seat held by her husband Keith Esau as he seeks the Secretary of State’s office.  She beat Aaron Young and Tom Stanion with 46% of the vote and will face Democrat Angela Schweller in the general election.

    District 17 – Rep. Tom Cox (R-Shawnee) won his primary with 75% of the vote against Jim Eschrich.  He will now face Democrat Laura Smith-Everett of Shawnee

    District 18 - Incumbent Rep. Cindy Neighbor (D-Shawnee) beat challenger Andrew Hurla with 82% of the vote, and now faces Republican primary winner Eric Jenkins, who beat Cathy Gordon.

    District 27 – Rep. Sean Tarwater (R-Stilwell) won his primary with 46% of the vote against Karen Snyder and Rochelle Bird.  Tarwater will face Democrat Nicole Rome of Overland Park in the general election.

    District 29 - Former Rep. James Todd (R-Overland Park) beat Peggy Galvin to set up a rematch against current Rep. Brett Parker (D-Overland Park).

    District 30 – Wendy Bingesser (R-Olathe) beat Colleen Webster by less than 200 votes.  Bingesser is considered more conservative than Webster.  She will face the winner of the Democrat primary for this seat, Brandon Woodard(D-Lenexa) who beat Matthew Calcara.  This seat is left open by Rep. Randy Powell, who did not file for election.

    District 38 - Incumbent Rep. Willie Dove (R-Bonner Springs) won over Noel Hull with 64% of the vote.  He will face Democrat Stuart Sweeney of Linwood in November.

    District 39 – Former Rep. Owen Donohoe (R-Shawnee) won by 203 votes (54%) over Kristy Acree with Rep. Shelee Brim is not running for reelection.  Brim had endorsed Acree.  Donohoe will now face Democrat Michael Bolton. 

    District 40 - Incumbent Debbie Deere (D-Lansing) beat Donald Terrien in the primary and will face Republican David French in the general election.

    District 42 - Incumbent Jim Karleskint won his primary over Lance Neelly with 53% of the vote (less than 200 votes).

    District 45 - Former lobbyist Cynthia Smith (R-Lawrence) won the primary against Ronald Thacker for the seat held for many years by retiring Rep. Tom Sloan.  The Democrat primary was won by Mike Amyx over Steven Davis and Aidan Loveland Koster.

    District  49 – House Speaker Pro Tem Scott Schwab is running for Secretary of State.  Megan Lynn won 89% of the vote over Fsehazion Desalegn.  Lynn has been endorsed by Schwab.  Lynn will now face Democrat Darnell Hunt.

    District 59 - Incumbent Rep. Blaine Finch (R-Ottawa) beat former Rep. Shari Weber with 71% of the vote.  He faces Democrat John Hall of Quenemo in the general election.  

    District 86 - Incumbent Rep. Jim Ward (D-Wichita) beat Alexander Vulgamore with 86% of the vote.  He now faces Republican Jim Price of Wichita for the general election.

    District 93 - Republican incumbent John Whitmer (R-Wichita) lost to challenger J.C. Moore (R-Clearwater.  Moore will not run against Clifton Beck (D-Clearwater) in the general election.  

    District 97 - Nick Hoheisel (R-Wichita) beat Michael Waller by 108 votes to fill the seat left by retiring Rep. Les Osterman (R-Wichita).  Hoheisel will face Rebecca Jenek (D-Wichita) in November.

    District 99 - Kristi Kirk (D-Wichita) beat Gerald Winget in order to challenge incumbent Rep. Susan Humphries (R-Wichita) in November.

    District 100 - Incumbent Rep. Daniel Hawkins (R-Wichita) beat challenger James Francis Breitenbach with 76% of the vote.  Hawkins will face Democrat Jennifer Winn in the general election.

    District 113 - Incumbent Rep. Greg Lewis won his primary over Brett Fairchild with 66% of the vote.  The Democrat primary was won by  David Curtis over David Serrault.  


  • 06 Aug 2018 10:32 AM | Anonymous

    Vote Tomorrow

    This is a VERY IMPORTANT election - with many positions determined by the primary election.  Check out your ballot today at myvoteinfo.voteks.org .  

    Select the Registration Information tab, then enter your county, first and last name, and birthdate.  It will pull up two ballots, one for the Democrat primary and one for the Republican primary.  They are indicated by a three digit number.  

    Follow your local candidates on Facebook and check out their websites to see what they stand for.  Most local newspapers have published articles about local candidates that you can read.  If you need help or want to know more about the candidates in your area, feel free to contact KABR.  We are happy to share information.  Do you have information about a candidate that we should know about?  Tell us!

    One more thing - did you know that candidates can tell if you vote in your elections, and even more important - if you vote in primary elections?  We want every elected official to know that their local liquor retailers are engaged in our elections, supporting the candidates who support us, and voting.  Reach out to the candidate of your choice and let them know that you are supporting them.

    The Governor’s Race:  The hotly contended primaries for the Governor’s office have attracted most of the attention and campaign funds for the 2018 Election thus far.  Governor Jeff Colyer has touted the positive fiscal condition of the State government and his conservative principles, while Kobach claims he is the true conservative in the race, with the just announced backing of President Trump.  These two seem to be the poll leaders and a recent commercial from the Colyer campaign urges voters to avoid casting their votes for any of the other candidates in this large field, claiming it would tilt the race to Kobach, who wants to return to the Brownback tax cuts.  Republican primary voters do tend toward the conservative – which leaves an interesting quandary for more moderate Republicans.  Do they vote for Barnett, who vows to support reasonable education funding and Medicaid expansion, or stick with Colyer, who has consistently supported most of Brownback’s policies?  If they reject Colyer, are they assuring a Kobach primary win as the commercial claims?

    The leaders in the Democrat primary are likely Senator Laura Kelly, former Ag Secretary Josh Svaty, and former Wichita mayor Carl Brewer.  The candidates have mostly similar views.  Kelly has strong name recognition as a long time legislator experienced with state budget issues and health care.  Svaty attracts many younger more progressive Democrats and has strong rural ties.  Brewer is well known and liked in south central Kansas, primarily Wichita.

    The winners of these primaries will face off in November in a three way race with an Independent candidate – expected to be Greg Orman.

    The Republican contenders are as follows:

    Current Governor and former Lt. Governor Jeff Colyer, M.D.  (R-Overland Park) with Lt. Governor candidate Tracy Mann

    Current Secretary of State Kris Kobach (R-Lecompton) with Lt. Governor candidate Wink Hartman

    Current Insurance Commissioner Ken Selzer (R-Leawood) with Lt. Governor candidate Jenifer Sanderson

    Former Senator Jim Barnett, M.D. (R-Topeka) with Lt. Governor candidate Rosie Hansen (his wife)

    Patrick “PK” Kucera (R-Overland Park) and Lt. Governor candidate Patricia Reitz

    Tyler Ruzich (R-Prairie Village) with Lt. Governor candidate Dominic Scavuzzo

    Joseph Tutera (R- Mission Hills) with Lt. Governor candidate Phillip Clemente

    The Democrat candidates are as follows:

    Senator Laura Kelly (D-Topeka) and Lt. Governor candidate Lynn Rogers (also a current senator)

    Former State Secretary of Agriculture Josh Svaty (D-Ellsworth) and Lt. Governor candidate Katrina Gier Lewison

    Former Wichita mayor Carl Brewer (D-Wichita) and Lt. Governor candidate Chris Morrow

    Jack Bergeson (D-Wichita) and Lt. Governor candidate Alexander Cline

    Arden Anderson (D-Olathe) and Lt. Governor candidate Dale Cowsert

    Congressional Races:   The races for the US House of Representatives have multiple candidates as well, with the District 2 race to fill the seat retired by Rep. Lynn Jenkins attracting the most attention.  Candidates include three current state senators:  Caryn Tyson (R-Parker), Steve Fitzgerald (R-Leavenworth) and Dennis Pyle (R-Hiawatha).  Current state representative Kevin Jones (R-Wellsville) and former House Speaker Doug Mays (R-Topeka) are also in the race.  Controversy has been raised by a relatively unknown candidate Steve Watkins (R-Topeka) who has become very visible with signs all over Topeka and plenty of purchased television commercials.  Watkins appears to be very well funded by his father and his campaign attracted a lot of criticism when it accused Tyson of voting for tax increases.  Tyson is the current Senate Taxation Committee Chair and is well known for her anti-tax position – her campaign has called for a retraction from Watkins.  This field also include Vernon Fields (R-Basehor).  The winner will face former Rep. Paul Davis (D-Lawrence) who ran for Governor in 2014.

    The incumbents are expected to win the other congressional races, although some think Kevin Yoder (District 3) could have a tough general election.  District 1 Roger Marshall (R-Great Bend) faces Nick Reinecker (R-Inman).  District 4 Rep. Ron Estes (R-Wichita) faces Ron M. Estes (R-Wichita).  Rep. Estes had to receive special permission to use his title as the incumbent Representative on the ballot to differentiate himself from the challenger.    

    This Is It:  There are 16 statehouse races that have only a primary race – in other words, the candidate who wins on August 7 will be the winning Representative.  There is no general election opposition filed for the seat.  12 of these are Republican races and 3 are Democrat.

    District 6 – Rep. Jene Vickrey (R-Louisburg) faces challenger Clifford Blackmore (R-Paola).  Vickrey is a former House Majority Leader with very conservative credentials.

    District 11 – Rep. Jim Kelly (R-Independence) faces challenger John Lowrance (R-Independence).

    District 12 – Rep. Doug Blex (R-Independence) faces challenger Brad Hall (R-Independence)

    District 13 – Rep. Larry Hibbard (R-Toronto) faces challenger Londa Tindle (R-Fredonia).

    District 22 – Rep. Nancy Lusk (D-Overland Park) faces challenger Michael L. Coleman III (D-Overland Park).

    District 46 – Rep. Boog Highberger (D-Lawrence) faces challenger Benjamin Ferlo (D-Lawrence).  Highberger is a former Lawrence mayor

    District 55 – Rep. Annie Kuether (D-Topeka) faces challenger Joseph Stringer (D-Topeka).  Stringer has taken on Kuether a couple of times in years past, but as a Republican.

    District 64 – Rep. Susan “Suzi” Swanson (R-Clay Center) faces challenger Kathy Martin (R-Clay Center).

    District 74 – Rep. Don Schroeder (R-Hesston) faces challenger Stephen Owens (R-Hesston).

    District 75 – Current Rep. Mary Martha Good (R-El Dorado) faces a challenger from former Rep. Will Carpenter (R-El Dorado).  Good beat Carpenter in the 2016 election as a more moderate leaning candidate.

    District 80 – Rep. Anita Judd-Jenkins (R-Arkansas City) faces challenger Bill Rhiley (R-Welllington)

    District 87 – This seat is retired by Roger Elliot.  Renee Erickson (R-Wichita) takes on Jeff Kennedy (R-Wichita).

    District 89 – Rep. KC Ohaebosim (D-Wichita) faces two challengers from Wichita – LeSean Tarkington and Marty Keenan.  Keenan has run for the Legislature several times in the past without success.

    District 104 – Rep. Steven Becker (R-Buhler) faces challenger Paul Waggoner (R-Hutchinson).

    District 107 – Rep. Susan Concannon (R-Beloit) faces challenger Sam Sacco (R-Concordia).

    District 124 – Position was retired by Rep. Steve Alford.  Jeffrey G. Locke (R-Sublette) faces Martin “Marty” Long (R-Ulysses).

    There are several House races with conservative candidates attempting to unseat more moderate Republicans that won in 2016, there are also a number of open seats available.  Here are some of those from Johnson County:

    District 8 – Rep. Patty Markley faces Chris Croft

    District 14 – Charlotte Esau is running for the House seat held by her husband Keith Esau as he seeks the Secretary of State’s office.  Aaron Young and Tom Stanion are also seeking the position.  Stanion seems to be the more moderate candidate, with Esau holding conservative endorsements.

    District 17 – Rep. Tom Cox faces Jim Eschrich

    District 27 – Rep. Sean Tarwater is a one term legislator who replaced House Speaker Merrick when he retired.  His challengers include Karen Snyder, an education proponent, and Rochelle Bird, who calls herself an “authentic conservative”.

    District 28 – Rep. Joy Koesten faces Kellie Warren, who has received conservative endorsements.  Koesten supported increased education funding and behavioral health programs.

    District 30 – Rep. Randy Powell is retiring this position.  Colleen Webster, with moderate credentials, is facing Wendy Bingesser, who is endorsed by conservative groups.  There is also a Democrat primary for this seat with Matthew Calcara and Brandon Woodard running.

    District 39 – Rep. Shelee Brim is not running for reelection.  She endorsed Kristy Acree who must face former conservative representative Owen Donohue.

    District 49 – House Speaker Pro Tem Scott Schwab is running for Secretary of State.  Megan Lynn is running for his seat against Fsehazion Desalegn.  Lynn has been endorsed by Schwab.

    If you have questions about the races on your ballot, do not hesitate to reach out to us.  Contact Amy at 785-969-1617 or campbell525@sbcglobal.net


      

     

      

                                           


  • 03 Aug 2018 10:42 AM | Anonymous

    2018 Primary Election is Tuesday!  This is a VERY IMPORTANT election - with many positions determined by the primary election.  Check out your ballot today at myvoteinfo.voteks.org .  

    Select the Registration Information tab, then enter your county, first and last name, and birthdate.  It will pull up two ballots, one for the Democrat primary and one for the Republican primary.  They are indicated by a three digit number.  

    Follow your local candidates on Facebook and check out their websites to see what they stand for.  Most local newspapers have published articles about local candidates that you can read.  If you need help or want to know more about the candidates in your area, feel free to contact KABR.  We are happy to share information.  Do you have information about a candidate that we should know about?  Tell us!

    One more thing - did you know that candidates can tell if you vote in your elections, and even more important - if you vote in primary elections?  We want every elected official to know that their local liquor retailers are engaged in our elections, supporting the candidates who support us, and voting.  

    (By the way, did you forget to contribute to your local Representative?  It's not too late - many candidates have websites with an online giving option.)

                                                           


  • 04 May 2018 10:45 PM | Anonymous

    The Senate passed tax cut legislation just after midnight and will return tomorrow.  The House adjourned around 11 p.m. and will come back at 10 a.m.

    Tomorrow, May 4, is the scheduled Sine Die – last official day of the 2018 Legislative Session.  Many had hoped that tonight would wrap up their work.

    The tax compromise conference committee report on HB 2228 decouples Kansas income tax policies from the Trump Tax Plan, in order to allow taxpayers to itemize on their state tax return even if they are not allowed to itemize their federal return.  It also includes a number of other tax policy items.  Read a summary of the bill here.  Supporters tout the bill as returning money to the taxpayers that would have increased Kansas revenues as a result of the federal tax plan. Opponents argue that the impact of the federal tax changes cannot yet be predicted, so the legislation is premature.

    Meanwhile, we have another storm rolling through Topeka, so it isn’t a bad idea to be spending the evening in the State Capitol made of solid stone.  

    Legislature Passes Budget

    The 2018 Legislature is taking a step toward reversing some of the years of cuts to higher education, K-12 education, mental health and disability programs, nursing home and hospital rates, and adopted a small state employee pay raise. 

    It took 12 rounds of negotiations over three days, but the House/Senate conference committee wrapped up budget negotiations around 7:30 p.m. Wednesday night.  All in all, it was the most courteous and respectful budget negotiations we have seen in a longtime  The bill was ready for floor debate by 5 p.m. on Thursday (today).

    The final budget compromise spends less than the House had proposed but more than the Senate version.  The spending projections estimate the State will have over $400 million on hand at the end of this fiscal year - the healthiest balance in years.  You can see the specific budget bill details at this link .

    The bill also includes a section that is a “sign of the times”-  restricting any agency from expending funds to create, enter into, or enforce any non-disclosure agreement in regards to claims from sexual harassment for FY 19, and restricting any agency from expending funds to settle sexual harassment claims against a state officer for FY 19.


                                          


  • 01 May 2018 8:52 PM | Anonymous

    Microbreweries Production; Alcoholic Candy; Domestic Beer in Refillable Containers; Hours of Sale for Alcohol; Self-service Beer from Automated Devices; HB 2470 allows microbreweries in Kansas to contract with other microbreweries for production and packaging of beer and hard cider, creates and amends law related to the sale of alcoholic candy and to the sale of domestic beer in refillable containers, allows licensed microbrewers in the state to produce beer containing up to 15.0 percent alcohol by weight, increases the length of time that certain businesses may serve or sell alcohol, and allows self service beer from automated machines. 

    Microbreweries Production and Packaging The bill allows microbreweries in Kansas to contract with other microbreweries for production and packaging of beer and hard cider. The contracting Kansas microbrewery will be held to all applicable state and federal laws concerning manufacturing, packaging, and labeling and will be responsible for payment of all state and federal taxes on the beer or hard cider. Production of beer or hard cider will count toward production limits in continuing law for both of the microbreweries involved in such a contract. The bill allows the beer or hard cider to be transferred to the microbrewery on whose behalf the beer or hard cider was produced, after production and packaging. 

    Sale of Alcoholic Candy; Adulterated Foods The bill defines “alcoholic candy” as follows: ● For purposes of manufacturing, “alcoholic candy” means any candy or other confectionery product with an alcohol content greater than 0.5 percent alcohol by volume; and ● For purposes of sale at retail locations, “alcoholic candy” means any candy or other confectionery product with an alcohol content greater than 1.0 percent alcohol by volume. The term is included in the definition of “alcoholic liquor.” Alcoholic candy is subject to regulation by the Alcoholic Beverage Control Division (ABC) of the Kansas Department of Revenue, and a retailer ise required to have a liquor license to sell such products. In addition, the bill amends law regarding adulterated food. The bill exempts confectionery containing not more than 1.0 percent alcohol by volume from the definition of adulterated food, change from 0.5 percent. 

    Sale of Domestic Beer in Refillable Containers The bill amends the definition of “domestic beer” to allow licensed microbrewers in the state to produce beer containing up to 15.0 percent alcohol by weight, changed from 10.0 percent alcohol by weight. 

    The bill allows a microbrewery licensee to sell beer manufactured by the licensee in refillable and sealable containers to consumers for off-premises consumption. Such containers may not contain less than 32 fluid ounces or more than 64 fluid ounces of beer. Licensees will be required to affix labels to all containers sold, which will include the licensee’s name and the name and type of beer in such container. 

    [Note: Enacted 2017 House Sub. for SB 13 amended provisions of the Liquor Control Act and Cereal Malt Beverage Act. Certain provisions of the 2017 bill were delayed in implementation until April 1, 2019. References to such date are to reconcile the provisions of the 2017 and 2018 legislation.] 

    Hours of Sale and Service for Alcohol The bill increases the length of time that certain businesses may serve or sell alcohol. Establishments licensed to serve alcohol will be allowed to sell drinks starting at 6:00 a.m. Under previous law, establishments were not allowed to sell drinks between the hours of 2:00 a.m. and 9:00 a.m. 

    Farm wineries, microbreweries, and microdistilleries are allowed to sell their respective alcoholic products in their original containers between 6:00 a.m. and 12:00 a.m. on any day. Former law limited the hours these establishments could sell alcohol on Sundays, between 12:00 p.m. and 6 p.m. for farm wineries and between 11:00 a.m. and 7:00 p.m. for microbreweries and microdistilleries. 

    “Day” means 6:00 a.m. until 2:00 a.m. the following calendar day. 

    Self-service Beer from Automated Devices The bill allows licensed public venues, clubs, and drinking establishments to provide self-service beer to customers from automated devices in the same manner as is permitted for wine under continuing law, so long as the licensee monitors the dispensing of beer and can control such dispensing. 

    Definitions The bill defines an “automated device” as any mechanized device capable of dispensing wine or beer directly to a customer in exchange for compensation that a licensee has received directly from a customer. “Day” means 6:00 a.m. until 2:00 a.m the following calendar day. 

    Notice A licensee will be required to provide written or electronic notice to the Director of ABC of a licensee’s intent to use an automated device at least 48 hours before the automated device is used on the licensed premises. 

    Video Monitoring The bill requires any licensee offering self-service beer or wine from any automated device to provide constant video monitoring of the automated devices at all times the licensee is open to the pubic. The licensee will be required to maintain the recorded footage for at least 60 days and, if requested, provide the footage to any agent of the Director of ABC or other authorized law enforcement agent. 

    Access Card Under the bill, compensation will be in the form of a prepaid access card containing a fixed monetary amount that can be directly exchanged for beer or wine from an automated device. The access cards may be sold, used, or reactivated only during the business day. The cards will be purchased from the licensee by a customer and a licensee could issue only one active card to a customer. An access card will be considered active if the access card contains monetary credit or has not yet been used to dispense 15 ounces of wine or 32 ounces of beer. The purchase of an access card is subject to the liquor drink tax. 

    A customer will be required to show a valid driver’s license, identification card, or other government-issued document that contains a photograph of the customer and indicates the customer is at least 21 years of age. The bill requires each access card to be programmed to require the customer show identification before the access card could be used for the first time during any business day or for any subsequent reactivation. 

    The bill requires that access cards become inactive at the end of each business day. The access card will become inactive if it is used to dispense 15 ounces of wine or 32 ounces of beer. A customer will be able to reactivate the access card to allow an additional 15 ounces of wine or 32 ounces of beer by showing identification to the licensee or licensee’s employee. 

    Service Hours The bill amends the prohibited service period to last from 2:00 a.m. to 6:00 a.m. Former law prohibited public venues, clubs, or drinking establishments from allowing the serving, mixing, or consumption of alcohol on its premises between 2:00 a.m. and 9:00 a.m. 

    Other Provisions The bill requires the Secretary of Revenue to adopt rules and regulations to implement the provisions of the bill relating to sales via automated devices by January 1, 2019. The bill also states that all laws and rules and regulations concerning the sale of alcohol to individuals under 21 years of age applies to the sales transaction of the access card.


  • 01 May 2018 1:39 PM | Anonymous


    A public hearing will be conducted on Friday, May 11, 2018, from 1:00 p.m. to 2:00 p.m. in the ABC Conference Room, 5th Floor of the Mills Building, 109 SW 9th Street, Topeka, Kansas to consider the adoption of the proposed rules and regulations of the Alcoholic Beverage Control Division, Department of Revenue, on a permanent basis. Learn more here.


  • 20 Apr 2018 5:49 PM | Anonymous

    On Friday, April 20, the Consensus Revenue Estimating (CRE) Group predicted that state revenues will be $217 million more than predicted in November for FY 18 and $316 million above estimates for FY 19.  This means that Kansas tax revenues will see a 10% increase over last fiscal year, with the 2017 income tax hike in effect.

    It appears that there are sufficient ending balance predictions to fund the recently passed K-12 funding legislation at the $525 million intended level – allowing restoration of the $80 million “error” that was somehow not part of the final language.  No one knows yet if the Kansas Supreme Court will accept the proposed funding plan.  This sets up a battle for the veto session over a long list of general budget items that have not yet been negotiated, repaying internal borrowing from the highway and retirement funds, additional school funding and the Senate’s new tax bill.  The Senate tax legislation is designed to decouple Kansas income tax rules from the Trump tax changes that are predicted to raise state tax bills for those who could no longer itemize.  The Senate tax legislation increases the individual standard deduction.

    Senate President Susan Wagle, R-Wichita, is quoted as follows:  "As a result of the strong (President Donald) Trump economy, these numbers include an unexpected federal windfall to the state due to federal tax reform. The surplus from this unanticipated windfall should be returned to the Kansas taxpayers. If any funds remain, we should exemplify fiscal responsibility and make the payments to KPERS that have been delayed and repay the loan that the Legislature took out last year to pay the bills. We owe it to future generations to pay back our current debts and obligations.   "When we return next week, I will urge my colleagues to pass legislation to allow Kansans who currently itemize under state tax law to continue to do so in the future."


  • 10 Apr 2018 6:47 AM | Anonymous

    Kansas City Retailers Conference and Legislative Luncheon

    Saturday and Sunday - April 21-22, 2018

    SCHEDULE 

     

    SATURDAY LEGISLATORS LUNCHEON & ROUNDTABLE:

      

    12:00 - 1:30 pm   Legislators and Retailers Luncheon - Informal Roundtable with State Legislators.  

    Worldwide Wine and Spirits, LLC., 
    17501 W 98th Street #35 - 38, Lenexa, KS 66219

    News from the Kansas Legislature - liquor law changes and tax legislation updates.  Visit with area legislators.

    1:30 pm  - 3:00 pm   Retailers Strategy Session - GOLD Meeting

    If you are a member of KABR, you should plan to attend.  Please send recommended agenda items to davisliquor2@cox.net if you have discussion items or proposed action items.  Proposals will be forwarded to the Board for approval.  (GOLD = Goals of Liquor Dealers).  

     

    Saturday Dinner:   

    6:30 - 8:30 p.m.  Dinner - Join other retailers for dinner - separate checks.

     

    SUNDAY EVENTS - 

     

    9:30am - 12:00 pm KABR Official Business Meeting of the Board of Directors 

    1st Floor Conference Room, Best Western KC Speedway Inn at the Legends

    All Members are Encouraged to Attend the Official Business Meeting.

    Kansas Liquor Retailers have achieved impressive success at the Kansas Legislature over the past eight years, and we have done so by working together.  Our greatest challenges are yet to come - join us! 

    Questions: contact Amy Campbell at 785-969-1617 or Brian Davis at 316-990-1425

    Contact the Best Western Premier KC Speedway Inn and Suites for KABR overnight rooms

    10401 France Family Dr, Kansas City, KS 66111

    (913) 334-4440


  • 08 Apr 2018 10:47 PM | Anonymous

    HB 2470 – Federal and State Affairs has added several liquor bills to this legislation which is now the Liquor Conference Committee report.  Initially, HB 2470 was a bill to allow microbreweries within the state of Kansas to contract with other microbreweries for production and packaging of beer and hard cider.  both barrels of beer and hard cider produced pursuant to such contracts would be included as part of the production limits for both contracting licensees. Calendar-year production limits in continuing law are 60,000 barrels of beer and 100,000 gallons of hard cider.   An amendment to allow members of the public to be judges at beer competitions was added on the Senate floor. That amendment was dropped by the conference committee.

    Bills added in conference include:

    HB 2766 and SB 433 – Self-serve beer dispensers – Introduced and supported by Topeka downtown developers and winner of a business startup contest.  Requires video surveillance, moves the wine dispenser oversight rules and regs into statute, and limits the volume sold on each purchaser card.

    HB 2475 – Microbrewery rules changes – Selling refillable and sealable containers (growlers) to consumers for off-premises consumption: such containers could not contain less than 32 fluid ounces or more than 64 fluid ounces of beer. Licensees would be required to affix labels to all containers sold with the name of the product and the microbrewery.  The bill changes the alcohol content limit for beer from 10% ABW to 16% ABW. Combined with HB 2476 in committee, then added to 2470 in conference.

    HB 2476 – Defines alcoholic candy as alcoholic liquor, thus allowing the sale of candy and food products containing alcohol above .05 ABW.  Controversy emerged on the Senate floor in a debate over the percentage, with Senator Denning amending to 1.0 ABW.  Concerns have come from Senator Bollier regarding Andres Chocolates and other producers.  The Conference Committee returned the threshold to .05 ABW based on federal TTB definitions, but the House rejected the report, returning it to conference.  Currently, the report sets the threshold at .05% ABW for manufacturers and 1.0% ABW for retail sales.

    HB 2482 – Day Drinking Bill – allows drinking establishments to begin selling alcohol at 6 a.m. instead of current restriction at 9 a.m.  Legislation was requested by a restaurant that features breakfast and moved through local government committees rather than traditional route through federal and state affairs.  The Senate Commerce Committee amended the bill to: ● Increase the number of hours in which farm wineries, microbreweries, and microdistilleries would be allowed to sell their respective alcoholic products; and ● Allow farm winery outlets to sell individual drinks.  The latter amendment attracted debate due to concerns about the “level playing field” for restaurants.  A farm winery outlet would be allowed to serve wine by the glass manufactured by the farm winery licensee, provided the outlet is in a county where the sale of alcoholic liquor is permitted. Wine sold pursuant to the bill would not be subject to the Club and Drinking Establishment Act, and a drinking establishment license would not be required to sell the drink. Under current law, a farm winery may have up to three licensed outlets, but the outlets are not permitted to sell individual drinks. The conference committee did not retain the “wine by the glass” amendment.  (Hours - Farm wineries, microbreweries, and microdistilleries would be allowed to sell their respective alcoholic products in their original containers between 6:00 a.m. and 12:00 a.m. on any day. Current law limits the hours these establishments may sell alcohol on Sundays, between 12:00 p.m. and 6 p.m. for farm wineries and between 11:00 a.m. and 7:00 p.m. for microbreweries and microdistilleries.)


  • 21 Mar 2018 10:55 AM | Anonymous

    The Governor has signed a bill to create an annual $20 fee for the Division of Alcoholic Beverage Control to fund the online licensing system and maintenance.

    HB 2362ABC Modernization Fee – Creates a $20 annual fee on license renewals to fund maintenance and updates to the online licensing system.  Fee will be paid on both initial and renewal liquor license applications. The bill maintains the current $50 application fee, but dedicates $20 of that fee to the modernization fund. The $20 modernization fee is added to the renewal application fee, which will remain at $10.  Introduced Feb 13 2017, House passed 96-28 March 6 2017. Senate FSA hearing Jan 30 2018.  Senate passed 37-3 Feb 21.  House concurred March 9 111-10.  Governor signed March 20.  Begins July 1 2018.


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Kansas Association of Beverage Retailers       P.O. Box 3842, Topeka, KS  66604      Email KABR  

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